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Making the Most of a Semantic Search-Based Job Market

By   /  October 11, 2012  /  No Comments

Miriam Salpeter of US News recently reported, “The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported there were 12.8 million unemployed, but 3.7 million unfilled positions.”

Miriam Salpeter of US News recently reported, “The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported there were 12.8 million unemployed, but 3.7 million unfilled positions. Despite the fact that there are approximately 40,000 job posting sites online, job seekers are challenged to find the best opportunities for them, and employers struggle to identify the best candidates. Job seekers who want to increase the relevancy of their search results and increase the chances of being found can take advantage of a relatively new high precision job search technology on the job search scene, known as semantic search.”

She goes on, “Monster.com launched semantic search three years ago with the introduction of its 6Sense semantic search technology. Monster’s 6Sense semantic search technology is at the heart of the company’s SeeMore product, which this week won the Top Product of the Year Award at the 15th annual HR Technology Conference & Expo. Earl Rennison, vice president of architecture with Monster.com, explains the benefits of using this type of search, and suggests tips for writing a resume that would help employers using this technology to find you.”

Salpeter also offers tips on how to write a resume for semantic search. The first important factor is keywords: “While keywords are still important in resumes, be sure to use them in context, and explain what accomplishments resulted from using the skills needed for the job. For example, don’t just say you have communication skills, explain how you used the skills and what you accomplished. While this has always been good resume advice, semantic search engines make it even more important, as the computer will give you credit for the context you provide in your resume instead of just picking out the keywords you include.”

Read more here.

Image: Courtesy Monster

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