Tag Archive for Acquia

2015: Envisioning The Year Ahead, Part 1

by Jennifer Zaino Just as it has been The Semantic Web Blog’s tradition to look back to the high points of the last year as we approach its end (see here and here), so too do we look ahead to expectations for the New Year, with the help of experts in the arena and its related fields.…

2014 Year In Review: Thanks For The Good Times, Part 1

As has been our tradition these last few years, The Semantic Web Blog steps back for experts in it and in related spaces to give us their opinion of the highlights of 2014. Here is Part 1: Vladimir Alexiev, OntotextData and Ontology Management Lead: Strong interest and commitment by the Cultural Heritage community to LOD…

Drupal Deepens Semantic Web Ties

Among the mainstream content management systems, you could make the case that Drupal was the first open source semantic CMS out there. At next week’s Semantic Technology and Business Conference, software engineer Stéphane Corlosquet of Acquia, which provides enterprise-level services around Drupal, and Bock & Co. principal Geoffrey Bock will discuss in this session Drupal’s…

Setting Government Data Free

As July 4 approaches, the subject of open government data can’t help but be on many U.S. citizens’ minds. That includes the citizens who are responsible for opening up that data to their fellow Americans. They might want to take a look at NuCivic Data Enterprise, the recently unveiled cloud-based, open source, open data platform for…

Reason To Be Thankful: Being Named A Fast-Growing Tech Company

It’s got to be a happy Thanksgiving for a number of tech companies that made their way to Deloitte’s recently-released Technology Fast 500. The 2013 ranking of the fastest-growing tech companies based in North America also has something to show for anyone who’s doubted that there’s money to be made taking advantage of semantic and…

Drupal is the Content Management System of Choice in DC

We recently reported on semantic technology’s potential role in national security. A new article shows progress on the front of semantic technology in government, but there are still some roadblocks. As the article puts it, “Using open source software in the federal government is challenging, but the problem is not due to the technology. The problem lies with old procurement models and regulations that are better suited for buying file cabinets and missiles than negotiating licenses for ‘free’ open source software.”