Tag Archive for Wikidata

2015: Envisioning The Year Ahead, Part 1

by Jennifer Zaino Just as it has been The Semantic Web Blog’s tradition to look back to the high points of the last year as we approach its end (see here and here), so too do we look ahead to expectations for the New Year, with the help of experts in the arena and its related fields.…

Opinion: Nova Spivack on a New Era in Semantic Web History

[Editor’s Note: Thanks to Nova Spivack for this guest post. Nova is a frequent speaker and blogger as well as CEO of Bottlenose, which uses big data mining to discover emerging trends for large brands and enterprises. More about Nova can be found on his website.] 2014 was the end of an era in Semantic…

Hello, Good-Bye at Wikidata

Last week saw Denny Vrandecic leave Wikidata as director of the project that as of last week passed a milestone of 20 million statements and as of this Monday saw the creation of its fifteen-millionth item, about a Wikipedia category related to beetles. This week also sees Lydia Pintscher, community communications for technical projects including…

DBpedia 3.9 Hits The Runway

DBpedia 3.9 is up and going. Word came today from Christian Bizer and Christopher Sahnwaldt that the new release boasts an overall increase in the number of concepts in the English edition from 3.7 to 4 million things, thanks to being based on updated Wikipedia dumps from the spring of 2013. Other numbers to impress:

At SemTechBiz, Knowledge Graphs Are Everywhere

Sing along with me to this classic hit from 1980: “Knowledge graphs are everywhere; They’re everywhere; My mind describes them to me.” Our Daughter’s Wedding’s song Lawn Chairs. But it’s a good description of some of the activity at the Semantic Technology & Business Conference this week, which saw Google, Yahoo and Wikidata chatting up…

Wikidata Phase 2 In Full Swing

In December the Semantic Web Blog spoke with Wikidata project director Denny Vrandecic about progress on Phase 1 of the work to create a free knowledge base about the world that can be read and edited by humans and machines (see story here). At the time, Vrandecic explained that January would begin the roll-out of language-by-language editions…